• Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

    Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist

    published: 25 Apr 2017
  • tomorrow today | Manganese nodules

    The seabeds of the worlds oceans are rich in raw materials such as diamonds, rare minerals and manganese nodules. They look like small potatoes but they contain metals such as nickel, cobalt and copper, and small amounts of rare metals like molybdenum, selenium and tellurium, which are used in the construction of electronics components.The hunt to recover the precious metals from the seabed has begun. German geologists recently carried out an extended research project in the Pacific. They wanted to find out how many manganese nodules there are, and where they are scattered. 24 million tons of precious metals are believed to be lying under the worlds oceans. The German geologists are trying to learn whether the nodules could be recovered from the seabed without damaging the environment, and...

    published: 16 Feb 2009
  • Polymetallic Nodules

    UK Seabed Resources, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin UK, in partnership with the Department for Business Innovation and Skills, has received a licence and contract to explore a 58,000 sq kilometre area of the Pacific for mineral-rich polymetallic nodules.

    published: 27 Mar 2013
  • Deep Sea Ocean Mining - HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER Project Azorian 21050

    This historic film shows techniques used to conduct deep ocean mining of the sea floor, which were pioneered in the 1960s. The potential for this type of mining (particularly of manganese nodules) was never fully realized. Ironically, the program did end up providing the cover for the USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), a deep-sea drillship platform built for the United States Central Intelligence Agency Special Activities Division secret operation Project Azorian to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, lost in April 1968. Hughes Glomar Explorer (HGE), as the ship was called at the time, was built between 1973 and 1974, by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for more than US$350 million at the direction of Howard Hughes for use by his company, Global Marine Development Inc.[4] This ...

    published: 07 Aug 2014
  • ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

    Description

    published: 06 Apr 2015
  • G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

    Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: 1. Understanding the Ocean bottom relief 2. Division of ocean bottom: continental-margins, mid oceanic ridge and deep sea plains 3. Ocean-continent margins: continental shelf, continental slope, continental rise 4. Continental shelf: Petroleum resources 5. Map Reading: Persian gulf, strait of Hormuz , Map: Barent sea, Russia,arctic sea 6. Resources from continental shelf: sulphur in gulf of Mexico; placer deposit – monazite, gold, diamond, zircon 7. Resources from continental shelf: pearls, calcium and fish 8. Continental slope: submarine canyon and submarine water fall 9. Continental rise: transition zone, absent near trenches 10. Deep sea plain/ abyssal plain and their resources 11. Poly-metallic nodules, their metal-components, global distribution, Indi...

    published: 21 Feb 2015
  • Deep sea mining!? Leave my down below alone!

    Mr Smashing makes a comeback with a deep sea mining disco love song. Destroying the deep sea to get metals for our throw-away mobile phones and other e-devices? Seas At Risk thinks it is better to step up efforts on the circular economy – make devices repairable, re-usable, recyclable. Use mineral resources more efficiently and keep them in the economy loop instead of wasting them. In our leaflet ‘Deep sea mining? Stop and think!’ you can read why we think deep sea mining has no place in the world’s Agenda 2030 for sustainable development. Let’s focus on creating a circular economy instead! http://www.seas-at-risk.org/images/pdf/Infographics/DSM-PDF-leaflet-light.pdf

    published: 21 Apr 2017
  • Mike Hall: How to determine climate history from cores of deep sea sediment

    Senior technician and laboratory manager Mike Hall describes work pioneered with Nick Shackleton on the use of mass spectrometers to determine climate change from deep sea sediment cores, containing shells of foraminifera. For more audio and video interview extracts from Mike Hall, visit the Voices of Science website: www.bl.uk/voices-of-science/interviewees/mike-hall.

    published: 18 Jul 2013
  • 10 Weird Sea Discoveries

    From bizarre fish found in the Mariana Trench to deep sea mystery of one of the oldest fish on earth, these are 10 WEIRD sea discoveries ! Underwater River -- Known as the Cenote (say-no-tay) Angelita Cave, this so-called underwater river can only be accessed by skilled divers. It’s located on the east coast of the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, and was formed over 6500 years ago, after a Manganese (manga-knees) Balls -- In 2015, scientists exploring the Atlantic Ocean were surprised to discover a huge patch of metal balls, some as small as golf balls, with others approximately the size of bowling balls. Turns out the metal balls are actually nodules made of manganese, and are commonly found in the Pacific, not the Atlantic. Scientists noted another difference … the nodules found in t...

    published: 07 Aug 2016
  • 14 Shocking Ocean Discoveries

    The ocean is one mysterious place, here are 14 shocking discoveries that you wont believe actually exist! Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr #7 The Non-Extinct “ExtinctFish, the Coelacanth This menacing-looking fish has quite a history. Thought to be extinct with the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period, the fish was discovered very much alive in 1938 when a fisherman caught one off the coast of East Africa. Even more shocking was the fact that another species of the Coelacanth was caught in the Indian Ocean by a fisherman and offered up for sale at a fish market in July 1998, letting scientists know that there are more species of this “extinct” fish than previously thought! The fish was 5ft long and weighed 29kg. #6 The Metal Balls of the Atlantic Ocean Scienti...

    published: 26 Feb 2016
  • Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

    published: 09 Jun 2017
  • Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific

    Several Pacific Island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. With a recent surge in commercial interest the Pacific has now become the centre of an international debate over whether the sustainable economic benefits for Pacific Islanders will outweigh the environmental risks of harvesting these precious metals from the bottom of the sea. This short film examines the issue from a number of key perspectives including; anti-deep sea mining NGO's; politicians; government agencies; deep sea mining companies and; the Secretariat of the Pacific Community.

    published: 20 Jul 2013
  • David Billett on the challenges for deep-sea exploration and exploitation - DSBS 2015

    Interview recorded in the SOPHIA Studio (www.sophia-mar.pt) during the Deep-Sea Biology Symposium (DSBS, Aveiro 2015). Topics: Ocean connectivity (food chain, surface productivity, sea cucumbers case study); The International Seabed Authority (scope, mission, organization bodies, the UNCLOS, deep-sea mining regulations, resource exploitation in ABNJ, access and benefit sharing); Types of deep-sea minerals (polymetallic nodules, polymetallic sulfides, cobalt crusts); New technologies for deep-sea research, exploration and exploitation; Need for science-industry cooperation; The importance of public outreach on policy making; Deep-sea mining study case (public perceptions, decision-making complexity); ISA's decision making process (building consensus); Precautionary approach vs sampling pro...

    published: 10 May 2016
  • Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

    Nautilus Animated Industrial that shows a sterilized version of the Deep Sea mining process.

    published: 01 Oct 2011
  • Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

    http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitco...

    published: 18 Mar 2011
  • Ocean Floor Sediments Demonstration

    published: 09 Feb 2012
  • Tomorrow today | Exploring the Deep (5)

    Deep sea exploration is viewed by marine scientists as one of the greatest scientific challenges of the future. This gigantic research area is a little known world. A mere one percent of this habitat has been explored to date. In collaboration with the MARUM Research Center in Bremen,Tomorrow Today's five-part series presents a fascinating glimpse into the work of marine researchers. The MARUM scientist Wolfgang Bach researches one of the most remarkable structures in the deep sea. The professor at Bremen University studies the hydrothermal vents called black smokers. Some of these chimney-like hot water springs on the sea bed are formed in the mid-Atlantic,in an area known as the Logatchev Field where tectonic plates are moving apart and a new ocean floor is emerging from below. How the b...

    published: 16 Mar 2009
  • Sustainable Seabed Mining: A New Concept For Atlantis II Deep

    Research on seabed exploitation and seabed mining is a complex transdisciplinary field that demands for further attention and development. Since the field links engineering, economics, environmental, legal and supply chain research, it demands for research from a systems point of view. This implies the application of a holistic sustainability framework of to analyse the feasibility of engineering systems. The research at hand aims to close this gap by developing such a framework and providing a review of seabed resources. Based on this review it identifies a significant potential for massive sulphides in inactive hydrothermal vents and sediments to solve global resource scarcities. The research aims to provide background on seabed exploitation and to apply a holistic systems engineering ap...

    published: 08 Jan 2013
  • "Oceanography", Manganese Nodules

    published: 17 Nov 2014
  • 8 Strange New Deep Sea Creatures

    Learn about some new sea creatures that recently made their debut to the land world! Special Thanks To: Victoria Vásquez at Pacific Shark Research Center, Kim Fulton-Bennett at MBARI, Jonathan Copley at University of Southampton, and Theodore Pietsch at University of Washington Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Accalia Elementia, Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Justin Lentz, Fatima Iqbal, Thomas J., Chris Peters, Tim Curwick, Lucy McGlasson, Andreas Heydeck, Will and Sonja Marple, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Charles George, Christopher Collins, and Patrick D. Ashmore. ----------...

    published: 08 Jun 2016
  • Should we be mining the sea bed for minerals

    British scientists have announced what they are calling an "astonishing" discovery deep in the Atlantic Ocean. They found that an underwater mountain near the Canary Islands holds some of the richest deposits of rare minerals anywhere on Earth.

    published: 12 Apr 2017
  • Ocean Sediments

    Brief review of the sediments found in the ocean -- their sources, distributions, and relative contributions. Developed for an introductory-level Oceanography Course. To access versions with CC and scripts, go to: http://www.ccsf.edu/earthrocks

    published: 09 Sep 2015
  • UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals

    A British company has announced that it is planning to exploit a new and controversial frontier in the search for valuable minerals, by mining the sea bed in the Pacific Ocean. UK Seabed Resources, a subsidiary of the British arm of Lockheed Martin, hopes to extract so-called nodules - small lumps of rock - from the ocean floor. High prices for copper, gold and rare earth minerals, all vital for modern electronics, have triggered a rush to find new sources.

    published: 14 Mar 2013
  • Ocean Sediments (Part 2): Physical Classification of Sediments & Nodules

    Mr. Lima contrasts oceanic muds & ooze as physical classifications of ocean sediments and then discusses nodules.

    published: 29 Dec 2011
Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:33
  • Updated: 25 Apr 2017
  • views: 22495
videos
Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Could_Transform_The_Globe
tomorrow today | Manganese nodules

tomorrow today | Manganese nodules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:25
  • Updated: 16 Feb 2009
  • views: 10861
videos
The seabeds of the worlds oceans are rich in raw materials such as diamonds, rare minerals and manganese nodules. They look like small potatoes but they contain metals such as nickel, cobalt and copper, and small amounts of rare metals like molybdenum, selenium and tellurium, which are used in the construction of electronics components.The hunt to recover the precious metals from the seabed has begun. German geologists recently carried out an extended research project in the Pacific. They wanted to find out how many manganese nodules there are, and where they are scattered. 24 million tons of precious metals are believed to be lying under the worlds oceans. The German geologists are trying to learn whether the nodules could be recovered from the seabed without damaging the environment, and which technology would be best suited to do that. We take a look at their findings.
https://wn.com/Tomorrow_Today_|_Manganese_Nodules
Polymetallic Nodules

Polymetallic Nodules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:12
  • Updated: 27 Mar 2013
  • views: 10505
videos
UK Seabed Resources, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin UK, in partnership with the Department for Business Innovation and Skills, has received a licence and contract to explore a 58,000 sq kilometre area of the Pacific for mineral-rich polymetallic nodules.
https://wn.com/Polymetallic_Nodules
Deep Sea Ocean Mining - HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER Project Azorian 21050

Deep Sea Ocean Mining - HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER Project Azorian 21050

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:30
  • Updated: 07 Aug 2014
  • views: 8635
videos
This historic film shows techniques used to conduct deep ocean mining of the sea floor, which were pioneered in the 1960s. The potential for this type of mining (particularly of manganese nodules) was never fully realized. Ironically, the program did end up providing the cover for the USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), a deep-sea drillship platform built for the United States Central Intelligence Agency Special Activities Division secret operation Project Azorian to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, lost in April 1968. Hughes Glomar Explorer (HGE), as the ship was called at the time, was built between 1973 and 1974, by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for more than US$350 million at the direction of Howard Hughes for use by his company, Global Marine Development Inc.[4] This is equivalent to $1.67 billion in present-day terms.[5] She set sail on 20 June 1974. Hughes told the media that the ship's purpose was to extract manganese nodules from the ocean floor. This marine geology cover story became surprisingly influential, spurring many others to examine the idea. But in sworn testimony in United States district court proceedings and in appearances before government agencies, Global Marine executives and others associated with Hughes Glomar Explorer project unanimously maintained that the ship could not be used in any economically viable ocean mineral operation. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Ocean_Mining_Hughes_Glomar_Explorer_Project_Azorian_21050
ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:06
  • Updated: 06 Apr 2015
  • views: 3573
videos https://wn.com/Ens351_Deep_Sea_Mining
G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 31:13
  • Updated: 21 Feb 2015
  • views: 143468
videos
Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: 1. Understanding the Ocean bottom relief 2. Division of ocean bottom: continental-margins, mid oceanic ridge and deep sea plains 3. Ocean-continent margins: continental shelf, continental slope, continental rise 4. Continental shelf: Petroleum resources 5. Map Reading: Persian gulf, strait of Hormuz , Map: Barent sea, Russia,arctic sea 6. Resources from continental shelf: sulphur in gulf of Mexico; placer deposit – monazite, gold, diamond, zircon 7. Resources from continental shelf: pearls, calcium and fish 8. Continental slope: submarine canyon and submarine water fall 9. Continental rise: transition zone, absent near trenches 10. Deep sea plain/ abyssal plain and their resources 11. Poly-metallic nodules, their metal-components, global distribution, India’s exploration of PMN 12. UNCLOS- UN convention of Laws of the seas 13. Discussion of previous questions from UPSC Prelims Powerpoint available at http://Mrunal.org/download Exam-Utility: UPSC CSAT, CDS, CAPF Faculty Name: Ms. Rajtanil Solanki Venue: Sardar Patel Institute of Public Administration (SPIPA), Satellite, Ahmedabad, Gujarat,India
https://wn.com/G5_P1_Ocean_Resources,_Eez,_Petroleum_Reserves,_Polymetallic_Nodules
Deep sea mining!? Leave my down below alone!

Deep sea mining!? Leave my down below alone!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:36
  • Updated: 21 Apr 2017
  • views: 4160
videos
Mr Smashing makes a comeback with a deep sea mining disco love song. Destroying the deep sea to get metals for our throw-away mobile phones and other e-devices? Seas At Risk thinks it is better to step up efforts on the circular economy – make devices repairable, re-usable, recyclable. Use mineral resources more efficiently and keep them in the economy loop instead of wasting them. In our leaflet ‘Deep sea mining? Stop and think!’ you can read why we think deep sea mining has no place in the world’s Agenda 2030 for sustainable development. Let’s focus on creating a circular economy instead! http://www.seas-at-risk.org/images/pdf/Infographics/DSM-PDF-leaflet-light.pdf
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Leave_My_Down_Below_Alone
Mike Hall: How to determine climate history from cores of deep sea sediment

Mike Hall: How to determine climate history from cores of deep sea sediment

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:39
  • Updated: 18 Jul 2013
  • views: 941
videos
Senior technician and laboratory manager Mike Hall describes work pioneered with Nick Shackleton on the use of mass spectrometers to determine climate change from deep sea sediment cores, containing shells of foraminifera. For more audio and video interview extracts from Mike Hall, visit the Voices of Science website: www.bl.uk/voices-of-science/interviewees/mike-hall.
https://wn.com/Mike_Hall_How_To_Determine_Climate_History_From_Cores_Of_Deep_Sea_Sediment
10 Weird Sea Discoveries

10 Weird Sea Discoveries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:12
  • Updated: 07 Aug 2016
  • views: 111341
videos
From bizarre fish found in the Mariana Trench to deep sea mystery of one of the oldest fish on earth, these are 10 WEIRD sea discoveries ! Underwater River -- Known as the Cenote (say-no-tay) Angelita Cave, this so-called underwater river can only be accessed by skilled divers. It’s located on the east coast of the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, and was formed over 6500 years ago, after a Manganese (manga-knees) Balls -- In 2015, scientists exploring the Atlantic Ocean were surprised to discover a huge patch of metal balls, some as small as golf balls, with others approximately the size of bowling balls. Turns out the metal balls are actually nodules made of manganese, and are commonly found in the Pacific, not the Atlantic. Scientists noted another difference … the nodules found in the Pacific usually have a flatter shape, while the ones from the Atlantic were very circular. Found at depths of 18000 feet, the nodules are thought to be 10 million years old … but their origin remains a mystery. The Churro Worm -- Four new species of an undersea creature were found 12000 feet underwater off the California coast. Called Xenoturbella (zen-ott-er-bella), they are fuschia colored flatworm-like creatures found on a whale carcass as well as on hydrothermal vents. One of the new species was christened ‘Xenoturbella Churro’, due to its resemblance to the Spanish fried-dough pastry. The four-inch long animal may have another claim to fame: It, along with its fellow species, could be related to us. In 2003, scientists at Cambridge claimed that Xenoturbella might share DNA with humans. Benthic (ben-tik) Comb Jelly -- Found within Japan’s Ryukyu (ree-you-kyou) Trench at an incredible depth of over 23,000 feet (7200 meters), this is the deepest dwelling known ctenophore (ten-uh-fur). The gelatinous organism can measure up to 8 cm wide and up to 20 cm long, and can attach itself to the ocean floor using two long filaments. Prior to its discovery in 2002, many scientists didn’t think it was possible for similar life forms to exist at such extreme depths, because food resources would be so scarce. The very existence of this animal suggests that there’s still much of the region’s ecosystem that remains unknown. Grand Underwater Canyon -- Named Zhemchug (gem-kug) Canyon, this huge underwater formation is located in the middle of the Bering Sea. Also defined as a submarine canyon, or a steep sided valley carved into the sea floor of the continental shelf, Zhemchug (gem-kug) is the largest such formation in the world … and reaching a depth of 8530 ft (2.6 km), it’s deeper than the Grand Canyon, with its deepest point being 6000 feet. The underwater canyon provides an important habitat to a wide range of ocean wildlife, including the Northern Fur Seal and many species of whale. Deep Diving Fish -- In 2010, marine biologists discovered a new type of snailfish almost 23,000 feet deep in the southeast Pacific Ocean. That’s nearly 4.5 miles below the ocean’s surface! In addition, groups of large crustacean scavengers and eels were found in the Peru-Chile trench of the ocean, which runs over 3600 miles and can reach depths of 26,000 feet. One of the deepest locations on earth, the area was previously thought to be completely free of fish. These discoveries might indicate there are thousands more unknown marine animals existing at extreme depths in the world’s oceans. In fact, a new species of snailfish was discovered in 2014 at a depth of over 26,000 feet by researchers using a remote operated vehicle while exploring the Mariana Trench in the Pacific. The Greater Barrier Reef -- The eastern coast of Australia is famous for the Great Barrier Reef … but now there may be a bigger, more spectacular reef on the south coast of the country. Take a look at some of these stunning pictures, and you can understand the excitement. Using a remote operated vehicle, researchers in 2015 explored depths up to 100 meters at Wilsons Promontory National Park in Victoria, Australia. Boulders the size of houses, and spectacular sponge gardens were some of the discoveries made ... along with coral fans and huge sea whips. Among the abundant fish species encountered were Australian barracudas, Longsnout Boarfish, and large schools of deep sea perch, known to grow over 2.5 feet long (80 cm). Park officials planned to analyze more footage to determine areas that might be safest for scuba divers. Subscribe to Epic Wildlife http://goo.gl/6rzs5u Let's Connect -- http://www.epicadamwildlife.com/ -- http://www.facebook.com/epicadamwildlife -- http://www.twitter.com/epicwildlife -- http://gplus.to/epicwildlife
https://wn.com/10_Weird_Sea_Discoveries
14 Shocking Ocean Discoveries

14 Shocking Ocean Discoveries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:59
  • Updated: 26 Feb 2016
  • views: 4841750
videos
The ocean is one mysterious place, here are 14 shocking discoveries that you wont believe actually exist! Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr #7 The Non-Extinct “ExtinctFish, the Coelacanth This menacing-looking fish has quite a history. Thought to be extinct with the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period, the fish was discovered very much alive in 1938 when a fisherman caught one off the coast of East Africa. Even more shocking was the fact that another species of the Coelacanth was caught in the Indian Ocean by a fisherman and offered up for sale at a fish market in July 1998, letting scientists know that there are more species of this “extinct” fish than previously thought! The fish was 5ft long and weighed 29kg. #6 The Metal Balls of the Atlantic Ocean Scientists who were in the Atlantic Ocean to study sea organisms found something a bit more unusual than they expected when their equipment kept getting snagged on something. They unearthed metal balls, known as manganese balls. These balls occur in other oceans, growing at the rate of millimeters over the course a million years by crystallizing around rocks or fossils into a nodule. To see so many on the ocean floor, especially some so round, was quite a shock to researchers, who even put out a press release about the discovery. #5 The Baltic Sea Anomaly Scientists have been debating the true nature of a large, mushroom-shaped disc found under the Baltic Sea in June 2011. Sonar images of the object show a stone or granite disc that resembles an ancient Millennium Falcon! The 200 by 25 ft disc could be a Nazi device that was located on the Baltic Sea shipping route that was made of steel and wire mesh designed to block radar detection by British and Russian submarines that used the area during World War II. Explorers have been repeatedly stymied by the Baltic Sea Anomaly because their sonar, radar and even satellite phones stop working when they get within 200 meters of the site. UFOlogists see it differently; they believe the disc is an ancient alien aircraft. Yeah, but how many parsecs would it take to make the Kessel Run? #4 The Mayan Underworld The ancient Mayans believed that in order to make it to the afterlife, dead souls needed to traverse watery caves with the help of a blind dog, and that caves are natural portals to other worlds. In 2008, scientists discovered huge underwater caves off the Yucatan Peninsula. The caves are large enough to contain stone temples and pyramids, sculptures, and human remains, mirroring the Maya belief that souls would confront great challenges on the way to the next world. One eerie passage consists of a 300 foot road leading straight to the water. Now scientists must ponder whether the Mayan beliefs were inspired by the existence of the caves, or whether the Maya created the caves as part of their religious practices. #3 The Yeti Crab You may have seen a variety of crabs at a visit to the aquarium, but you’ve probably not seen a crab like this. Known as the Yeti Crab, this species was discovered in 2005 in the South Pacific Ocean. The crab’s discovery required scientists to actually create a new genus, Kiwaidae. This crab is special not only because it’s hairy, but also because it has no eyes. It grows its own food and bacteria in its fur and lives in hydrothermal vents. #2 The Galleon San Jose Built in 1696, the Spanish ship Galleon San Jose was lost in 1708, after crewmembers were engaged in a sea battle with the English. On November 27, 2015, the wreckage of the ship was found in the Caribbean Sea, along with its treasure. Originally on its way to France, the ship was laden with cargo of gold, silver and emeralds when it sank, and 600 people were reportedly on board when the ship went down. Many of the ship’s personal effects, cannons, and guns are still intact. Before the discovery, historians believed the ship had exploded. The recovered treasure is worth an estimated $3 to $17 billion. #1 The “LostUnderwater Forest You may find a city or ruins, or sunken treasure in the sea, but finding a forest is probably a dream….But for diver Dawn Watson, finding a lost forest went from fantasy to reality. In 2015, Watson discovered an incredible underwater forest off the coast of Norfolk. The trees are estimated to be near 10,000 years, and have been hidden underwater since the Ice Age, only to be uncovered during a storm. The forest was once part of Doggerland, a piece of land that was a bridge between Britain and Europe.
https://wn.com/14_Shocking_Ocean_Discoveries
Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:34
  • Updated: 09 Jun 2017
  • views: 20
videos
https://wn.com/Exploration_Of_Deep_Sea_Minerals
Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific

Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific

  • Order:
  • Duration: 24:57
  • Updated: 20 Jul 2013
  • views: 10047
videos
Several Pacific Island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. With a recent surge in commercial interest the Pacific has now become the centre of an international debate over whether the sustainable economic benefits for Pacific Islanders will outweigh the environmental risks of harvesting these precious metals from the bottom of the sea. This short film examines the issue from a number of key perspectives including; anti-deep sea mining NGO's; politicians; government agencies; deep sea mining companies and; the Secretariat of the Pacific Community.
https://wn.com/Under_Pressure_Deep_Sea_Minerals_In_The_Pacific
David Billett on the challenges for deep-sea exploration and exploitation - DSBS 2015

David Billett on the challenges for deep-sea exploration and exploitation - DSBS 2015

  • Order:
  • Duration: 24:20
  • Updated: 10 May 2016
  • views: 90
videos
Interview recorded in the SOPHIA Studio (www.sophia-mar.pt) during the Deep-Sea Biology Symposium (DSBS, Aveiro 2015). Topics: Ocean connectivity (food chain, surface productivity, sea cucumbers case study); The International Seabed Authority (scope, mission, organization bodies, the UNCLOS, deep-sea mining regulations, resource exploitation in ABNJ, access and benefit sharing); Types of deep-sea minerals (polymetallic nodules, polymetallic sulfides, cobalt crusts); New technologies for deep-sea research, exploration and exploitation; Need for science-industry cooperation; The importance of public outreach on policy making; Deep-sea mining study case (public perceptions, decision-making complexity); ISA's decision making process (building consensus); Precautionary approach vs sampling problem; Need for consistent funding of deep-sea research. David Billett, PhD in Deep-sea Ecology at the University of Southampton, is the Managing Director at Deep Seas Environmental Solutions and a Visiting Research Fellow at the National Oceanography Centre. His work focuses in finding solutions for the use of ocean resources and the long-term conservation of marine ecosystems. 00:08 Research focus 02:33 About the ISA 06:34 Types of deep-sea minerals 11:57 Technology for deep-sea exploration and exploitation 12:44 Science-industry cooperation 15:03 Public outreach 16:56 Deep-sea mining 19:56 Decision-making process: the ISA case 21:50 Challenges for deep-sea research SOPHIA - Knowledge for the management of marine environment is a literacy for the oceans project developed in Portugal. It is a not for profit collaboration between the Administration and knowledge and research community. It provides training and knowledge content to help develop a common language within this community. Follow us on: www.sophia-mar.pt www.facebook.com/sophia.mar.pt twitter.com/Projeto_SOPHIA Deep-Sea Biology Symposium - The triennial DSBS is the most important meeting for deep-sea biologists around the world. The 14th edition was held in Aveiro, Portugal, in 2015.
https://wn.com/David_Billett_On_The_Challenges_For_Deep_Sea_Exploration_And_Exploitation_Dsbs_2015
Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

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  • Duration: 4:16
  • Updated: 01 Oct 2011
  • views: 22555
videos
Nautilus Animated Industrial that shows a sterilized version of the Deep Sea mining process.
https://wn.com/Nautilus_Animated_Industrial.Mp4
Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

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  • Duration: 4:29
  • Updated: 18 Mar 2011
  • views: 5757
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http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitcomm.com -- Or join the conversation on social media: @KitcoNewsNOW on Twitter: http://twitter.com/kitconews --- Kitco News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/kitconews
https://wn.com/Deep_Ocean_Mining_The_New_Frontier
Ocean Floor Sediments Demonstration

Ocean Floor Sediments Demonstration

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  • Duration: 3:59
  • Updated: 09 Feb 2012
  • views: 3698
videos
https://wn.com/Ocean_Floor_Sediments_Demonstration
Tomorrow today | Exploring the Deep (5)

Tomorrow today | Exploring the Deep (5)

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  • Duration: 4:47
  • Updated: 16 Mar 2009
  • views: 5815
videos
Deep sea exploration is viewed by marine scientists as one of the greatest scientific challenges of the future. This gigantic research area is a little known world. A mere one percent of this habitat has been explored to date. In collaboration with the MARUM Research Center in Bremen,Tomorrow Today's five-part series presents a fascinating glimpse into the work of marine researchers. The MARUM scientist Wolfgang Bach researches one of the most remarkable structures in the deep sea. The professor at Bremen University studies the hydrothermal vents called black smokers. Some of these chimney-like hot water springs on the sea bed are formed in the mid-Atlantic,in an area known as the Logatchev Field where tectonic plates are moving apart and a new ocean floor is emerging from below. How the black smokers come into being,and what enables molluscs,shrimp and crabs to exist in their chemically aggressive environment are just two of the questions that Wolfgang Bach wants to answer.
https://wn.com/Tomorrow_Today_|_Exploring_The_Deep_(5)
Sustainable Seabed Mining: A New Concept For Atlantis II Deep

Sustainable Seabed Mining: A New Concept For Atlantis II Deep

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  • Duration: 5:23
  • Updated: 08 Jan 2013
  • views: 4037
videos
Research on seabed exploitation and seabed mining is a complex transdisciplinary field that demands for further attention and development. Since the field links engineering, economics, environmental, legal and supply chain research, it demands for research from a systems point of view. This implies the application of a holistic sustainability framework of to analyse the feasibility of engineering systems. The research at hand aims to close this gap by developing such a framework and providing a review of seabed resources. Based on this review it identifies a significant potential for massive sulphides in inactive hydrothermal vents and sediments to solve global resource scarcities. The research aims to provide background on seabed exploitation and to apply a holistic systems engineering approach to develop general guidelines for sustainable seabed mining of polymetallic sulphides and a new concept and solutions for the Atlantis II Deep deposit in the Red Sea. The research methodology adpted will start with acquiring a broader academic and industrial view on sustainable seabed mining through online survey and expert interviews on seabed mining. The experts are chosen according to their knowledge in one or more of the dimensions of seabed mining introduced in the research framework. The Nautilus Minerals case is also reviewd for lessons learned for seabed mining and the presented concept in particular with identification of challaenges and issues. Therafter, a new concept and site specific assessment for Atlantis II Deep is developed. The research undertaken in this study provides a new perspective regarding the sustainable seabed mining. The main contributions of this research are the development of extensive guidelines for key issues in sustainable seabed mining as well as a new concept for seabed mining involving engineering systems, environmental impact, economical benefits, logistics chain supply and legal aspects.
https://wn.com/Sustainable_Seabed_Mining_A_New_Concept_For_Atlantis_Ii_Deep
"Oceanography", Manganese Nodules

"Oceanography", Manganese Nodules

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  • Duration: 3:27
  • Updated: 17 Nov 2014
  • views: 981
videos
https://wn.com/Oceanography_,_Manganese_Nodules
8 Strange New Deep Sea Creatures

8 Strange New Deep Sea Creatures

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  • Duration: 9:31
  • Updated: 08 Jun 2016
  • views: 1274731
videos
Learn about some new sea creatures that recently made their debut to the land world! Special Thanks To: Victoria Vásquez at Pacific Shark Research Center, Kim Fulton-Bennett at MBARI, Jonathan Copley at University of Southampton, and Theodore Pietsch at University of Washington Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Accalia Elementia, Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Justin Lentz, Fatima Iqbal, Thomas J., Chris Peters, Tim Curwick, Lucy McGlasson, Andreas Heydeck, Will and Sonja Marple, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Charles George, Christopher Collins, and Patrick D. Ashmore. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: Ninja Lanternshark: http://www.deepseanews.com/2015/12/ninja-lanternshark-the-new-shark-species-you-will-never-see-coming/ http://www.oceansciencefoundation.org/josf/josf17d.pdf https://mlmlblog.wordpress.com/2016/04/13/ninjalanternshark/ Sockworms: http://www.mbari.org/deep-sea-worms-slither-around-the-bottom-of-the-animal-tree-of-life/ http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v530/n7588/full/nature16545.html#t http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v424/n6951/full/nature01851.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrlIHaClWmg http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/why-you-should-care-about-acoelomorph-flatworms-17782785/?no-ist Hoff Crabs: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0127621 http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-03/uos-iha030215.php https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gPyG6cT_pU http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew16.jpg http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew14.jpg youtube.com/expeditionlog Eyeless Shrimp: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qtR18l5_ys http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slider4.jpg http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew24.jpg http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew7.jpg http://www.livescience.com/31034-embargoed-eyeless-shrimp-discovered-deepest-volcanic-vents.html youtube.com/expeditionlog Anglerfish http://www.sci-news.com/biology/science-lasiognathus-dinema-anglerfish-03102.html http://www.bioone.org/doi/10.1643/CI-14-181 http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/150807-anglerfish-new-species-ocean-animals-science/ Harp Sponge http://www.mbari.org/scientists-discover-extraordinary-new-carnivorous-sponge/ - Harp sponge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VC3tAtXdaik http://www.mbari.org/researchers-describe-four-new-species-of-killer-sponges-from-the-deep-sea/ - other new carnivorous sponges Casper Octopus http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1603/logs/mar2/mar2.html [images available to download and use] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rWHuwWJv3c&ab_channel=oceanexplorergov Crossota Jellyfish http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/about.html http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1605/background/ex1605-factsheet.pdf http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1605/dailyupdates/media/video/0424-jelly/0424-jelly.html
https://wn.com/8_Strange_New_Deep_Sea_Creatures
Should we be mining the sea bed for minerals

Should we be mining the sea bed for minerals

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  • Duration: 1:01
  • Updated: 12 Apr 2017
  • views: 52
videos
British scientists have announced what they are calling an "astonishing" discovery deep in the Atlantic Ocean. They found that an underwater mountain near the Canary Islands holds some of the richest deposits of rare minerals anywhere on Earth.
https://wn.com/Should_We_Be_Mining_The_Sea_Bed_For_Minerals
Ocean Sediments

Ocean Sediments

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  • Duration: 15:05
  • Updated: 09 Sep 2015
  • views: 7167
videos
Brief review of the sediments found in the ocean -- their sources, distributions, and relative contributions. Developed for an introductory-level Oceanography Course. To access versions with CC and scripts, go to: http://www.ccsf.edu/earthrocks
https://wn.com/Ocean_Sediments
UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals

UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals

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  • Duration: 1:54
  • Updated: 14 Mar 2013
  • views: 1525
videos
A British company has announced that it is planning to exploit a new and controversial frontier in the search for valuable minerals, by mining the sea bed in the Pacific Ocean. UK Seabed Resources, a subsidiary of the British arm of Lockheed Martin, hopes to extract so-called nodules - small lumps of rock - from the ocean floor. High prices for copper, gold and rare earth minerals, all vital for modern electronics, have triggered a rush to find new sources.
https://wn.com/UK_Firm_In_Deep_Sea_Mining_Plan_For_Minerals
Ocean Sediments (Part 2): Physical Classification of Sediments & Nodules

Ocean Sediments (Part 2): Physical Classification of Sediments & Nodules

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  • Duration: 7:12
  • Updated: 29 Dec 2011
  • views: 2216
videos
Mr. Lima contrasts oceanic muds & ooze as physical classifications of ocean sediments and then discusses nodules.
https://wn.com/Ocean_Sediments_(Part_2)_Physical_Classification_Of_Sediments_Nodules