• tomorrow today | Manganese nodules

    The seabeds of the worlds oceans are rich in raw materials such as diamonds, rare minerals and manganese nodules. They look like small potatoes but they contain metals such as nickel, cobalt and copper, and small amounts of rare metals like molybdenum, selenium and tellurium, which are used in the construction of electronics components.The hunt to recover the precious metals from the seabed has begun. German geologists recently carried out an extended research project in the Pacific. They wanted to find out how many manganese nodules there are, and where they are scattered. 24 million tons of precious metals are believed to be lying under the worlds oceans. The German geologists are trying to learn whether the nodules could be recovered from the seabed without damaging the environment, and...

    published: 16 Feb 2009
  • Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

    Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist

    published: 25 Apr 2017
  • Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

    published: 09 Jun 2017
  • Polymetallic Nodules

    UK Seabed Resources, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin UK, in partnership with the Department for Business Innovation and Skills, has received a licence and contract to explore a 58,000 sq kilometre area of the Pacific for mineral-rich polymetallic nodules.

    published: 27 Mar 2013
  • Deep Sea Ocean Mining - HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER Project Azorian 21050

    This historic film shows techniques used to conduct deep ocean mining of the sea floor, which were pioneered in the 1960s. The potential for this type of mining (particularly of manganese nodules) was never fully realized. Ironically, the program did end up providing the cover for the USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), a deep-sea drillship platform built for the United States Central Intelligence Agency Special Activities Division secret operation Project Azorian to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, lost in April 1968. Hughes Glomar Explorer (HGE), as the ship was called at the time, was built between 1973 and 1974, by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for more than US$350 million at the direction of Howard Hughes for use by his company, Global Marine Development Inc.[4] This ...

    published: 07 Aug 2014
  • G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

    Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: 1. Understanding the Ocean bottom relief 2. Division of ocean bottom: continental-margins, mid oceanic ridge and deep sea plains 3. Ocean-continent margins: continental shelf, continental slope, continental rise 4. Continental shelf: Petroleum resources 5. Map Reading: Persian gulf, strait of Hormuz , Map: Barent sea, Russia,arctic sea 6. Resources from continental shelf: sulphur in gulf of Mexico; placer deposit – monazite, gold, diamond, zircon 7. Resources from continental shelf: pearls, calcium and fish 8. Continental slope: submarine canyon and submarine water fall 9. Continental rise: transition zone, absent near trenches 10. Deep sea plain/ abyssal plain and their resources 11. Poly-metallic nodules, their metal-components, global distribution, Indi...

    published: 21 Feb 2015
  • Mystery Balls Found In Atlantic, Small Metal Orbs Found In Earth's Atmosphere

    http://www.undergroundworldnews.com Ever since they were discovered in 1873, scientists have been trying to find out the origin of the millions of potato-sized metal balls that carpet the world's oceans. Known as manganese nodules, these lumps contain valuable metals that scientists someday hope to harvest from the sea floor. Now German scientists could be closer to solving the mystery of their origin after stumbling on the largest patch of manganese nodules ever found in the Atlantic. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2957453/What-mystery-alien-balls-ocean-floor-Scientists-baffled-manganese-rocks-discovered-Atlantic.html#ixzz3S3f6vIzi Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2955620/Did-aliens-sen...

    published: 18 Feb 2015
  • "Oceanography", Manganese Nodules

    published: 17 Nov 2014
  • Ocean Basins (Part 2): Features of the Ocean Floor (Deep Ocean Basins)

    Mr. Lima discusses features of the ocean floor associated with the deep-ocean basins (Abyssal Plains, Guyots, Seamoutns, Abyssal Hills, Mid-Ocean Ridges, Trenches), as well as other ocean features such as Atolls, Barrier Islands, and Island Arcs He also briefly describes oceanic topographic maps.

    published: 28 Dec 2011
  • Ghostlike Octopod Discovered Deep Underwater In Hawaii

    Strange things exist 13,000 feet below the ocean surface, such as the lumps of the metal manganese that slowly accrete like pearls along the deep seafloor. In certain places, especially in the Pacific, the spherical clumps of varying diameter form vast fields. Some of these metallic nodules, researchers found while combing the Atlantic seabed in 2015, may reach the size of bowling balls. Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/national/article121960998.html#storylink=cpy

    published: 20 Dec 2016
  • 8 Strange New Deep Sea Creatures

    Learn about some new sea creatures that recently made their debut to the land world! Special Thanks To: Victoria Vásquez at Pacific Shark Research Center, Kim Fulton-Bennett at MBARI, Jonathan Copley at University of Southampton, and Theodore Pietsch at University of Washington Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Accalia Elementia, Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Justin Lentz, Fatima Iqbal, Thomas J., Chris Peters, Tim Curwick, Lucy McGlasson, Andreas Heydeck, Will and Sonja Marple, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Charles George, Christopher Collins, and Patrick D. Ashmore. ----------...

    published: 08 Jun 2016
  • What is ABYSSAL PLAIN? What does ABYSSAL PLAIN mean? ABYSSAL PLAIN meaning & explanation

    What is ABYSSAL PLAIN? What does ABYSSAL PLAIN mean? ABYSSAL PLAIN meaning - ABYSSAL PLAIN definition - ABYSSAL PLAIN explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/ An abyssal plain is an underwater plain on the deep ocean floor, usually found at depths between 3,000 metres (9,800 ft) and 6,000 metres (20,000 ft). Lying generally between the foot of a continental rise and a mid-ocean ridge, abyssal plains cover more than 50% of the Earth’s surface. They are among the flattest, smoothest and least explored regions on Earth. Abyssal plains are key geologic elements of oceanic basins (the other elements being an elevated mid-ocean ridge and fl...

    published: 08 Sep 2017
  • Ocean Sediments

    Brief review of the sediments found in the ocean -- their sources, distributions, and relative contributions. Developed for an introductory-level Oceanography Course. To access versions with CC and scripts, go to: http://www.ccsf.edu/earthrocks

    published: 09 Sep 2015
  • Manganese Nodule Detection

    ROBUST H2020 Project: WP3 Automatic Recognition of mining targets. Detecting Manganese Nodules using Deep Learning with Darknet Yolo on Pangaea Dataset*. *Greinert, Jens; Schoening, Timm; Köser, Kevin; Rothenbeck, Marcel (2017): Seafloor images and raw context data along AUV tracks during SONNE cruises SO239 and SO242/1. GEOMAR - Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.882349

    published: 01 Dec 2017
  • What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy

    Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode webseries dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future...

    published: 12 Feb 2018
  • ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

    Description

    published: 06 Apr 2015
  • Ocean Floor Sediments Demonstration

    published: 09 Feb 2012
  • Mystery Metal Balls Found on Ocean Floors!

    Ever since they were discovered in 1873, scientists have been trying to find out the origin of the millions of potato-sized metal balls that carpet the world's oceans. Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2957453/What-mystery-alien-balls-ocean-floor-Scientists-baffled-manganese-rocks-discovered-Atlantic.html Find Me & Follow Me: https://twitter.com/ShantiUniverse https://www.facebook.com/pages/Shanti-Universe/1405680779677488 http://shantiuniversenewsnow.blogspot.com/ https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/108273886503213598014/108273886503213598014/posts Check Out my NEW Website: http://proxyponder.com ~*Get the ShantiUniverse App! For Android & iphone: http://fanap...

    published: 19 Feb 2015
  • Manganese Nodules & The Mitotic Spindle

    Manganese Nodules Grow Too Quickly Manganese nodules on the sea floor have consistently been shown to grow at rates thousands of times faster than the slow rates calculated from radioisotope dating methods. (Thomas, B. and J. Morris. 2013. Doesn’t Radioisotope Dating Prove Rocks Are Millions of Years Old? Acts & Facts 42(2):20.) The Mitotic Spindle Apparatus An evolutionary website describes the spindle machine used in mitosis cell division: “At the cellular level, the mitotic spindle apparatus is arguably the most complicated piece of machinery in existence.” (Hewitt, J. The Machinery of Mitosis: Kinetechores, centrioles and chromosome pumps. Phys Org. Posted on phys.org October 4, 2013.)

    published: 13 Aug 2015
  • JPI Oceans: Ecological Aspects of Deep-Sea Mining

    In 1989 German ocean researchers started a unique long-term experiment off the coast of Peru. To explore the effects of potential deep sea mining on the seabed, they plowed in about eleven square kilometer area around the seabed. (c) GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel 2016

    published: 31 Mar 2016
  • Ferromanganese nodules/concretions in Lake Winnipesaukee

    Ferromanganese nodules/concretions formed by groundwater seeping into Lake Winnipesaukee and precipitating out the iron and manganese dissolved within.

    published: 09 Dec 2012
  • 13 Breathtaking Underwater Discoveries

    Which of these discoveries do you find the most incredible? Let us know in the comments below and subscribe to our channel for more amazing videos just like this, thanks for watching. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 9 - Underwater ExplorerGoing over to Israel, divers discovered a water well that is thought to be around 7500-years old, along with a Neolithic village. It’s believed that the location of this well was possibly the site of the world’s oldest olive oil production centre. Around this site, they also discovered thousands of crushed olive stones, which led them to make that assumption. 8 - Get your dose of Vitamin Sea… Mark Holley is the person to credit for discovering an underwater structure that very closely resembles Stonehenge. He, along with his colleag...

    published: 26 May 2017
  • Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

    http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitco...

    published: 18 Mar 2011
  • CHINESE submersible discovers polymetallic nodules in SOUTH CHINA SEA

    CHINESE submersible discovers polymetallic nodules in SOUTH CHINA SEA A Chinese manned submersible has discovered a collection of polymetallic nodules in Puyuan Seamount in the disputed South China Sea. The submersible named 'Jiaolong' was underwater for six and a half hours on the second stage of China's 38th ocean scientific expedition, which will last until May 13. "Learning the distribution of polymetallic nodules will help us to choose a site for experimenting with collection, which is one of the main goals of the mission, " Wu Changbin, general commander of the second stage of the expedition said. My channel here: http://bit.ly/2bekG3G URL video: http://bit.ly/2pYhgZa G+ here: http://bit.ly/2ceByt8

    published: 09 May 2017
developed with YouTube
tomorrow today | Manganese nodules
4:25

tomorrow today | Manganese nodules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:25
  • Updated: 16 Feb 2009
  • views: 12086
videos
The seabeds of the worlds oceans are rich in raw materials such as diamonds, rare minerals and manganese nodules. They look like small potatoes but they contain metals such as nickel, cobalt and copper, and small amounts of rare metals like molybdenum, selenium and tellurium, which are used in the construction of electronics components.The hunt to recover the precious metals from the seabed has begun. German geologists recently carried out an extended research project in the Pacific. They wanted to find out how many manganese nodules there are, and where they are scattered. 24 million tons of precious metals are believed to be lying under the worlds oceans. The German geologists are trying to learn whether the nodules could be recovered from the seabed without damaging the environment, and which technology would be best suited to do that. We take a look at their findings.
https://wn.com/Tomorrow_Today_|_Manganese_Nodules
Deep-sea mining could transform the globe
2:33

Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:33
  • Updated: 25 Apr 2017
  • views: 43939
videos
Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Could_Transform_The_Globe
Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals
5:34

Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:34
  • Updated: 09 Jun 2017
  • views: 491
videos
https://wn.com/Exploration_Of_Deep_Sea_Minerals
Polymetallic Nodules
3:12

Polymetallic Nodules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:12
  • Updated: 27 Mar 2013
  • views: 12083
videos
UK Seabed Resources, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin UK, in partnership with the Department for Business Innovation and Skills, has received a licence and contract to explore a 58,000 sq kilometre area of the Pacific for mineral-rich polymetallic nodules.
https://wn.com/Polymetallic_Nodules
Deep Sea Ocean Mining - HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER Project Azorian 21050
14:30

Deep Sea Ocean Mining - HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER Project Azorian 21050

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:30
  • Updated: 07 Aug 2014
  • views: 12730
videos
This historic film shows techniques used to conduct deep ocean mining of the sea floor, which were pioneered in the 1960s. The potential for this type of mining (particularly of manganese nodules) was never fully realized. Ironically, the program did end up providing the cover for the USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), a deep-sea drillship platform built for the United States Central Intelligence Agency Special Activities Division secret operation Project Azorian to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, lost in April 1968. Hughes Glomar Explorer (HGE), as the ship was called at the time, was built between 1973 and 1974, by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for more than US$350 million at the direction of Howard Hughes for use by his company, Global Marine Development Inc.[4] This is equivalent to $1.67 billion in present-day terms.[5] She set sail on 20 June 1974. Hughes told the media that the ship's purpose was to extract manganese nodules from the ocean floor. This marine geology cover story became surprisingly influential, spurring many others to examine the idea. But in sworn testimony in United States district court proceedings and in appearances before government agencies, Global Marine executives and others associated with Hughes Glomar Explorer project unanimously maintained that the ship could not be used in any economically viable ocean mineral operation. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Ocean_Mining_Hughes_Glomar_Explorer_Project_Azorian_21050
G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules
31:13

G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 31:13
  • Updated: 21 Feb 2015
  • views: 197788
videos
Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: 1. Understanding the Ocean bottom relief 2. Division of ocean bottom: continental-margins, mid oceanic ridge and deep sea plains 3. Ocean-continent margins: continental shelf, continental slope, continental rise 4. Continental shelf: Petroleum resources 5. Map Reading: Persian gulf, strait of Hormuz , Map: Barent sea, Russia,arctic sea 6. Resources from continental shelf: sulphur in gulf of Mexico; placer deposit – monazite, gold, diamond, zircon 7. Resources from continental shelf: pearls, calcium and fish 8. Continental slope: submarine canyon and submarine water fall 9. Continental rise: transition zone, absent near trenches 10. Deep sea plain/ abyssal plain and their resources 11. Poly-metallic nodules, their metal-components, global distribution, India’s exploration of PMN 12. UNCLOS- UN convention of Laws of the seas 13. Discussion of previous questions from UPSC Prelims Powerpoint available at http://Mrunal.org/download Exam-Utility: UPSC CSAT, CDS, CAPF Faculty Name: Ms. Rajtanil Solanki Venue: Sardar Patel Institute of Public Administration (SPIPA), Satellite, Ahmedabad, Gujarat,India
https://wn.com/G5_P1_Ocean_Resources,_Eez,_Petroleum_Reserves,_Polymetallic_Nodules
Mystery Balls Found In Atlantic, Small Metal Orbs Found In Earth's Atmosphere
3:06

Mystery Balls Found In Atlantic, Small Metal Orbs Found In Earth's Atmosphere

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:06
  • Updated: 18 Feb 2015
  • views: 16070
videos
http://www.undergroundworldnews.com Ever since they were discovered in 1873, scientists have been trying to find out the origin of the millions of potato-sized metal balls that carpet the world's oceans. Known as manganese nodules, these lumps contain valuable metals that scientists someday hope to harvest from the sea floor. Now German scientists could be closer to solving the mystery of their origin after stumbling on the largest patch of manganese nodules ever found in the Atlantic. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2957453/What-mystery-alien-balls-ocean-floor-Scientists-baffled-manganese-rocks-discovered-Atlantic.html#ixzz3S3f6vIzi Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2955620/Did-aliens-send-metal-orb-seed-life-Earth-Microscopic-sphere-contain-microorganisms-claims-astrobiologist.html
https://wn.com/Mystery_Balls_Found_In_Atlantic,_Small_Metal_Orbs_Found_In_Earth's_Atmosphere
"Oceanography", Manganese Nodules
3:27

"Oceanography", Manganese Nodules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:27
  • Updated: 17 Nov 2014
  • views: 1423
videos
https://wn.com/Oceanography_,_Manganese_Nodules
Ocean Basins (Part 2): Features of the Ocean Floor (Deep Ocean Basins)
12:25

Ocean Basins (Part 2): Features of the Ocean Floor (Deep Ocean Basins)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:25
  • Updated: 28 Dec 2011
  • views: 26783
videos
Mr. Lima discusses features of the ocean floor associated with the deep-ocean basins (Abyssal Plains, Guyots, Seamoutns, Abyssal Hills, Mid-Ocean Ridges, Trenches), as well as other ocean features such as Atolls, Barrier Islands, and Island Arcs He also briefly describes oceanic topographic maps.
https://wn.com/Ocean_Basins_(Part_2)_Features_Of_The_Ocean_Floor_(Deep_Ocean_Basins)
Ghostlike Octopod Discovered Deep Underwater In Hawaii
1:54

Ghostlike Octopod Discovered Deep Underwater In Hawaii

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:54
  • Updated: 20 Dec 2016
  • views: 21
videos
Strange things exist 13,000 feet below the ocean surface, such as the lumps of the metal manganese that slowly accrete like pearls along the deep seafloor. In certain places, especially in the Pacific, the spherical clumps of varying diameter form vast fields. Some of these metallic nodules, researchers found while combing the Atlantic seabed in 2015, may reach the size of bowling balls. Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/national/article121960998.html#storylink=cpy
https://wn.com/Ghostlike_Octopod_Discovered_Deep_Underwater_In_Hawaii
8 Strange New Deep Sea Creatures
9:31

8 Strange New Deep Sea Creatures

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:31
  • Updated: 08 Jun 2016
  • views: 1673700
videos
Learn about some new sea creatures that recently made their debut to the land world! Special Thanks To: Victoria Vásquez at Pacific Shark Research Center, Kim Fulton-Bennett at MBARI, Jonathan Copley at University of Southampton, and Theodore Pietsch at University of Washington Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Accalia Elementia, Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Justin Lentz, Fatima Iqbal, Thomas J., Chris Peters, Tim Curwick, Lucy McGlasson, Andreas Heydeck, Will and Sonja Marple, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Charles George, Christopher Collins, and Patrick D. Ashmore. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: Ninja Lanternshark: http://www.deepseanews.com/2015/12/ninja-lanternshark-the-new-shark-species-you-will-never-see-coming/ http://www.oceansciencefoundation.org/josf/josf17d.pdf https://mlmlblog.wordpress.com/2016/04/13/ninjalanternshark/ Sockworms: http://www.mbari.org/deep-sea-worms-slither-around-the-bottom-of-the-animal-tree-of-life/ http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v530/n7588/full/nature16545.html#t http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v424/n6951/full/nature01851.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrlIHaClWmg http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/why-you-should-care-about-acoelomorph-flatworms-17782785/?no-ist Hoff Crabs: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0127621 http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-03/uos-iha030215.php https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gPyG6cT_pU http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew16.jpg http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew14.jpg youtube.com/expeditionlog Eyeless Shrimp: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qtR18l5_ys http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slider4.jpg http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew24.jpg http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew7.jpg http://www.livescience.com/31034-embargoed-eyeless-shrimp-discovered-deepest-volcanic-vents.html youtube.com/expeditionlog Anglerfish http://www.sci-news.com/biology/science-lasiognathus-dinema-anglerfish-03102.html http://www.bioone.org/doi/10.1643/CI-14-181 http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/150807-anglerfish-new-species-ocean-animals-science/ Harp Sponge http://www.mbari.org/scientists-discover-extraordinary-new-carnivorous-sponge/ - Harp sponge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VC3tAtXdaik http://www.mbari.org/researchers-describe-four-new-species-of-killer-sponges-from-the-deep-sea/ - other new carnivorous sponges Casper Octopus http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1603/logs/mar2/mar2.html [images available to download and use] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rWHuwWJv3c&ab_channel=oceanexplorergov Crossota Jellyfish http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/about.html http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1605/background/ex1605-factsheet.pdf http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1605/dailyupdates/media/video/0424-jelly/0424-jelly.html
https://wn.com/8_Strange_New_Deep_Sea_Creatures
What is ABYSSAL PLAIN? What does ABYSSAL PLAIN mean? ABYSSAL PLAIN meaning & explanation
3:30

What is ABYSSAL PLAIN? What does ABYSSAL PLAIN mean? ABYSSAL PLAIN meaning & explanation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:30
  • Updated: 08 Sep 2017
  • views: 892
videos
What is ABYSSAL PLAIN? What does ABYSSAL PLAIN mean? ABYSSAL PLAIN meaning - ABYSSAL PLAIN definition - ABYSSAL PLAIN explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/ An abyssal plain is an underwater plain on the deep ocean floor, usually found at depths between 3,000 metres (9,800 ft) and 6,000 metres (20,000 ft). Lying generally between the foot of a continental rise and a mid-ocean ridge, abyssal plains cover more than 50% of the Earth’s surface. They are among the flattest, smoothest and least explored regions on Earth. Abyssal plains are key geologic elements of oceanic basins (the other elements being an elevated mid-ocean ridge and flanking abyssal hills). In addition to these elements, active oceanic basins (those that are associated with a moving plate tectonic boundary) also typically include an oceanic trench and a subduction zone. Abyssal plains were not recognized as distinct physiographic features of the sea floor until the late 1940s and, until very recently, none had been studied on a systematic basis. They are poorly preserved in the sedimentary record, because they tend to be consumed by the subduction process. The creation of the abyssal plain is the end result of spreading of the seafloor (plate tectonics) and melting of the lower oceanic crust. Magma rises from above the asthenosphere (a layer of the upper mantle) and as this basaltic material reaches the surface at mid-ocean ridges it forms new oceanic crust. This is constantly pulled sideways by spreading of the seafloor. Abyssal plains result from the blanketing of an originally uneven surface of oceanic crust by fine-grained sediments, mainly clay and silt. Much of this sediment is deposited by turbidity currents that have been channelled from the continental margins along submarine canyons down into deeper water. The remainder of the sediment is composed chiefly of pelagic sediments. Metallic nodules are common in some areas of the plains, with varying concentrations of metals, including manganese, iron, nickel, cobalt, and copper. These nodules may provide a significant resource for future mining ventures. Owing in part to their vast size, abyssal plains are currently believed to be a major reservoir of biodiversity. The abyss also exerts significant influence upon ocean carbon cycling, dissolution of calcium carbonate, and atmospheric CO2 concentrations over timescales of 1001000 years. The structure and function of abyssal ecosystems are strongly influenced by the rate of flux of food to the seafloor and the composition of the material that settles. Factors such as climate change, fishing practices, and ocean fertilization are expected to have a substantial effect on patterns of primary production in the euphotic zone. This will undoubtedly impact the flux of organic material to the abyss in a similar manner and thus have a profound effect on the structure, function and diversity of abyssal ecosystems.
https://wn.com/What_Is_Abyssal_Plain_What_Does_Abyssal_Plain_Mean_Abyssal_Plain_Meaning_Explanation
Ocean Sediments
15:05

Ocean Sediments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:05
  • Updated: 09 Sep 2015
  • views: 11105
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Brief review of the sediments found in the ocean -- their sources, distributions, and relative contributions. Developed for an introductory-level Oceanography Course. To access versions with CC and scripts, go to: http://www.ccsf.edu/earthrocks
https://wn.com/Ocean_Sediments
Manganese Nodule Detection
11:07

Manganese Nodule Detection

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  • Duration: 11:07
  • Updated: 01 Dec 2017
  • views: 62
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ROBUST H2020 Project: WP3 Automatic Recognition of mining targets. Detecting Manganese Nodules using Deep Learning with Darknet Yolo on Pangaea Dataset*. *Greinert, Jens; Schoening, Timm; Köser, Kevin; Rothenbeck, Marcel (2017): Seafloor images and raw context data along AUV tracks during SONNE cruises SO239 and SO242/1. GEOMAR - Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.882349
https://wn.com/Manganese_Nodule_Detection
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy
6:45

What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy

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  • Duration: 6:45
  • Updated: 12 Feb 2018
  • views: 1239
videos
Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode webseries dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This webseries addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy is a cartographical survey of technologies that have contributed to ocean literacy and seabed mapping. Structured around a single shot along a vertical axis, the episode inquires about deep sea mining and the types of geologic formations where it is set to occur, particularly hydrothermal vents. Understanding the process of deep sea mining demands not only a temporal investigation – its main dates, legal, and corporate landmarks, and scientific breakthroughs – but also a spatial axis connecting the seafloor to outer space cartographic technologies. After all, we know less about the ocean depths than about the universe beyond this blue planet. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: http://www.deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ http://www.savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ http://deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 http://oceanolivre.org/ https://www.facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Ann Dom, Armin Linke, Birgit Schneider, Duncan Currie, Katherine Sammler, Lisa Rave, Lucielle Paru, Matt Gianni, Natalie Lowrey, Payal Sampat, Phil Weaver, Stefan Helmreich, and everyone who helped this webseries. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. Commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy. www.tba21academy.org http://www.tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282
https://wn.com/What_Is_Deep_Sea_Mining_A_Web_Series._Episode_1_Tools_For_Ocean_Literacy
ENS351 Deep Sea Mining
6:06

ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

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  • Duration: 6:06
  • Updated: 06 Apr 2015
  • views: 5788
videos https://wn.com/Ens351_Deep_Sea_Mining
Ocean Floor Sediments Demonstration
3:59

Ocean Floor Sediments Demonstration

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  • Duration: 3:59
  • Updated: 09 Feb 2012
  • views: 4385
videos
https://wn.com/Ocean_Floor_Sediments_Demonstration
Mystery Metal Balls Found on Ocean Floors!
3:13

Mystery Metal Balls Found on Ocean Floors!

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  • Duration: 3:13
  • Updated: 19 Feb 2015
  • views: 2789
videos
Ever since they were discovered in 1873, scientists have been trying to find out the origin of the millions of potato-sized metal balls that carpet the world's oceans. Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2957453/What-mystery-alien-balls-ocean-floor-Scientists-baffled-manganese-rocks-discovered-Atlantic.html Find Me & Follow Me: https://twitter.com/ShantiUniverse https://www.facebook.com/pages/Shanti-Universe/1405680779677488 http://shantiuniversenewsnow.blogspot.com/ https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/108273886503213598014/108273886503213598014/posts Check Out my NEW Website: http://proxyponder.com ~*Get the ShantiUniverse App! For Android & iphone: http://fanapp.mobi/shantiuniverseapp
https://wn.com/Mystery_Metal_Balls_Found_On_Ocean_Floors
Manganese Nodules & The Mitotic Spindle
1:09

Manganese Nodules & The Mitotic Spindle

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  • Duration: 1:09
  • Updated: 13 Aug 2015
  • views: 201
videos
Manganese Nodules Grow Too Quickly Manganese nodules on the sea floor have consistently been shown to grow at rates thousands of times faster than the slow rates calculated from radioisotope dating methods. (Thomas, B. and J. Morris. 2013. Doesn’t Radioisotope Dating Prove Rocks Are Millions of Years Old? Acts & Facts 42(2):20.) The Mitotic Spindle Apparatus An evolutionary website describes the spindle machine used in mitosis cell division: “At the cellular level, the mitotic spindle apparatus is arguably the most complicated piece of machinery in existence.” (Hewitt, J. The Machinery of Mitosis: Kinetechores, centrioles and chromosome pumps. Phys Org. Posted on phys.org October 4, 2013.)
https://wn.com/Manganese_Nodules_The_Mitotic_Spindle
JPI Oceans: Ecological Aspects of Deep-Sea Mining
4:08

JPI Oceans: Ecological Aspects of Deep-Sea Mining

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  • Duration: 4:08
  • Updated: 31 Mar 2016
  • views: 1489
videos
In 1989 German ocean researchers started a unique long-term experiment off the coast of Peru. To explore the effects of potential deep sea mining on the seabed, they plowed in about eleven square kilometer area around the seabed. (c) GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel 2016
https://wn.com/Jpi_Oceans_Ecological_Aspects_Of_Deep_Sea_Mining
Ferromanganese nodules/concretions in Lake Winnipesaukee
20:24

Ferromanganese nodules/concretions in Lake Winnipesaukee

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  • Duration: 20:24
  • Updated: 09 Dec 2012
  • views: 601
videos
Ferromanganese nodules/concretions formed by groundwater seeping into Lake Winnipesaukee and precipitating out the iron and manganese dissolved within.
https://wn.com/Ferromanganese_Nodules_Concretions_In_Lake_Winnipesaukee
13 Breathtaking Underwater Discoveries
6:23

13 Breathtaking Underwater Discoveries

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  • Duration: 6:23
  • Updated: 26 May 2017
  • views: 329554
videos
Which of these discoveries do you find the most incredible? Let us know in the comments below and subscribe to our channel for more amazing videos just like this, thanks for watching. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 9 - Underwater ExplorerGoing over to Israel, divers discovered a water well that is thought to be around 7500-years old, along with a Neolithic village. It’s believed that the location of this well was possibly the site of the world’s oldest olive oil production centre. Around this site, they also discovered thousands of crushed olive stones, which led them to make that assumption. 8 - Get your dose of Vitamin Sea… Mark Holley is the person to credit for discovering an underwater structure that very closely resembles Stonehenge. He, along with his colleague Brian Abbot, were out on a ship with sonar equipment. They spotted an odd formation in the water. This was on Lake Michigan, and all the structures are said to be the same distance apart and are quite similar to structures found in France and England, making people doubt that they are a natural formation. Research is still being conducted. 7 - Under the sea… This discovery has been astounding for scientists, and has seen the most amazing images emerge from their super find. It’s a river under the sea, which was found on Mexico's Yucatan peninsula. It’s called the Cenote Angelita, translated to Little Angel – and you see a winding river and even branches! The river is actually hydrogen sulphide, a gas created by the mixture of salt and fresh water. Only exceptionally skilled divers are able to get there, so thank goodness for excellent underwater cameras! 6 - Just Add Water… In 2014, a group of divers made an incredible discovery. Whilst they were diving off the coast of Goza island in Malta, they came up a Phoenician shipwreck which is thought to date back to 700 BC. This is one of the oldest ships recovered, and there are so many pieces in tact – which will be highly beneficial in in shedding light on life back then. Part of the relics discovered include 20 lava grinding stones, large wine jugs and other pieces of crockery. 5 - The ocean is full of surprises… These alien looking balls have been found on the ocean floor, and are baffling scientists. They are manganese rocks, and they contain valuable metal. They were found in the Atlantic Ocean, and their purpose has been confusing people since the 1870’s! Some suggest it’s a chemical reaction between bacteria and the water. They’re called manganese nodules, and German scientists have discovered a vast amount of them. They grow between 1 and 5 mm every million years, so some are thought to be 10 million years old! 4 - The gap widens… Divers have been instrumental in showing us how the North American Plate is pulling away from the Eurasian Plate – which means the gap between Europe and the USA is widening! In order for you to dive there yourself, you would need to take a trip to Iceland! 3 - So much to discover… According to some sites, we have only scratched the bottom of the surface of the ocean, and still have about 95% of the ocean to still discover. If that’s the case, imagine what is still out there for us to find! Over in New Jersey, archaeologists found 2 beautifully preserved locomotives dating back to the 1850’s. No record of when the trains were built or when they were lost, and to this day – no one can explain how they got there. 2 - My heads under water… It was back in 2000 that French archaeologist, Franck Goddio discovered Heracleion. It’s an underwater city based near Alexandria in Egypt, and during the 13 years spent excavating the area – many incredible items have resurfaced. The city dates back to the 12th century, and it went through a stage of extreme wealth. It’s thought to have sunk due to earthquakes, and had been buried for centuries. Some of the items discovered included 60 ships, gold coins, bronze and stone weights, statues, stone with Greek and Egyptian inscription and hundreds of anchors. 1 - Sink or swim… These are called Ice Fingers, and as you can guess – they’re a totally rare phenomenon which occurs in the Arctic and Antarctic. They’re the result of cold, sinking brine which is heavier than the water surrounding it. It goes on to form a brinicle, which is a hollow icicle, when it comes into contact with the warmer water. It’s been dubbed the ice finger of death, because any sea creature caught in the expanding web of ice, are caught for good and end up freezing to death. The BBC One series, Frozen Planet, managed to film one – which took a total of 6 hours to form and sink.
https://wn.com/13_Breathtaking_Underwater_Discoveries
Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier
4:29

Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

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  • Duration: 4:29
  • Updated: 18 Mar 2011
  • views: 5935
videos
http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitcomm.com -- Or join the conversation on social media: @KitcoNewsNOW on Twitter: http://twitter.com/kitconews --- Kitco News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/kitconews
https://wn.com/Deep_Ocean_Mining_The_New_Frontier
CHINESE submersible discovers polymetallic nodules in SOUTH CHINA SEA
2:06

CHINESE submersible discovers polymetallic nodules in SOUTH CHINA SEA

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  • Duration: 2:06
  • Updated: 09 May 2017
  • views: 1249
videos
CHINESE submersible discovers polymetallic nodules in SOUTH CHINA SEA A Chinese manned submersible has discovered a collection of polymetallic nodules in Puyuan Seamount in the disputed South China Sea. The submersible named 'Jiaolong' was underwater for six and a half hours on the second stage of China's 38th ocean scientific expedition, which will last until May 13. "Learning the distribution of polymetallic nodules will help us to choose a site for experimenting with collection, which is one of the main goals of the mission, " Wu Changbin, general commander of the second stage of the expedition said. My channel here: http://bit.ly/2bekG3G URL video: http://bit.ly/2pYhgZa G+ here: http://bit.ly/2ceByt8
https://wn.com/Chinese_Submersible_Discovers_Polymetallic_Nodules_In_South_China_Sea
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